FINANCIAL AID

Frequently Asked Questions


UNCG Attendance Verification
1. Why am I required to verify attendance for some students?
Federal Financial Aid Regulations require that the UNCG Financial Aid Office verify that a student receiving specific types of aid has attended all courses for the period of attendance when federal financial aid was received by a student.

 

2. I teach hundreds of students each semester. Do I have to verify attendance for all of them?
No. Faculty are only required to enter a last date of academic related activity when assigning a grade of F or I (Incomplete). This is part of UNCG’s plan for ensuring compliance with all federal requirements associated with participating in federal financial aid programs.

 

3. I do not take attendance in my class and/or do not have a class attendance policy. How can I determine a student’s last date of attendance?
Federal regulations allow UNCG to use a student’s last documented participation in an academically related activity as the last date of attendance/withdrawal date. This is referred to as the Last Date of Academic Activity (LDAA). If you do not take attendance or have a class attendance policy, you should still be able to determine a student’s Last Date of Academic Activity (LDAA) based on any of the following student activities within your course:
  • Physically attending a class
  • Submitting an academic assignment
  • Taking an exam, competing an interactive tutorial, or participating in computer-assisted instruction
  • Attending a study group that is assigned by the institution
  • Participating in an online discussion about academic matters
  • Initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a question about the academic subject studied in the course
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    4. How do I determine a Last Date of Academic Activity (LDAA) for an online course?
    Determining the Last Date of Academic Activity for an online course is very similar to that of an in-person class. Any of the following student activities within your course could be used to verify their attendance:
  • Accessing course content via Blackboard or Canvas
  • Submitting an academic assignment
  • Taking an exam, competing an interactive tutorial, or participating in computer-assisted instruction
  • Participating in an online discussion about academic matters
  • Initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a question about the academic subject studied in the course
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    5. Based on my records, I have a student on my roster who will receive a failing grade because they never attended my class and/or do not have any academic activity for my course. How should I denote this in UNCGenie?
    Students who have never attended your course or have not logged any academic activity should be denoted by using zeros (0) for each digit in the Last Attend Date: 00/00/0000

     

    6. What happens if an institution cannot document that the student completed the period of attendance when financial aid was received?
    If an institution cannot document that a student attended and participated in an academic activity beyond the 60% point of the semester, a “Return to Title IV” refund calculation will need to be completed. A “Return to Title IV” refund calculation is a federally mandated calculation that determines whether or not a student may owe a repayment of any of the financial aid funds they received at the beginning of the semester.

     

    7. In the past, I’ve been contacted via email about students who need to have their course attendance verified. Will inputting a Last Date of Academic Activity (LDAA) in UNCGenie prevent this from happening in the future?
    Yes. In the past, all instructors have been contact via email to verify impacted students’ Last Date of Academic Activity. However, reporting this information in UNCGenie when assigning grades will significantly decrease the number of communications between the Financial Aid Office and individual faculty members. You may periodically be contacted to verify the Last Date of Academic Activity for a student who withdrew from your course earlier in the semester, but this will occur much less frequently.

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